Social Democracy, the Left and the CCF/NDP in Canada: Past, Present, and Future

May 12, 2017

Avi Lewis, Social Democracy and the Left in Canada

This event is also the opening keynote address for the Social Democracy and the Left in Canada: Past, Present, and Future conference.

What does social democracy look like in Canada? What is the future of the left in Canada? Join Avi Lewis for a discussion of the past, present, and future of social democracy and the left in Canada.

This event celebrates the 85th anniversary of the founding of the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation at the Royal Canadian Legion in Calgary. Avi Lewis, activist and son of former Ontario NDP Leader Stephen Lewis and grandson of former NDP Leader David Lewis, will share his thoughts on the legacy of the CCF/NDP and the future of social democracy in Canada.

This event is also the opening keynote address for the Social Democracy and the Left in Canada: Past, Present, and Future conference.

Avi Lewis is an award winning documentary filmmaker and long-time television journalist. His films include The Take and This Changes Everything. He is one of the co-authors of the Leap Manifesto and one of its leading advocates.

The Royal Canadian Legion Calgary (Alberta No. 1)

Reception at 7:00.

Remarks at 7:30.

Cash bar.

Tickets

 EVENT ADDRESSES AND INFORMATION

The Royal Canadian Legion Calgary (Alberta No. 1)

116 7 Avenue Southeast

Calgary, AB T2G 0H5

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 The opening keynote for the conference will take place at the Royal Canadian Legion Calgary (Alberta No. 1) in downtown Calgary. The branch has its roots in the formation of veterans groups to provide support for returning servicemen during World War One. In 1916, a small community of soldiers who had returned to Calgary after fighting in Europe banded together to form a mutual aid society. A year later, this group formed the Calgary branch of the Great War Veterans’ Association of Canada, an organization dedicated to helping returning servicemen to reintegrate into civilian life. By 1919, the organization had grown dramatically – from 300 members in 1917 to 3200 only two years later – and its rented space in the Alberta Club was becoming inadequate. In 1919, the Prince of Wales broke sod on land provided by the city for the construction of a Memorial Hall honouring the heroic contributions of Canada’s servicemen during World War One. Financial problems delayed construction and the building was not ready for opening until 1922. Dedicated to the memory of those who served in the Great War, the Memorial Hall offered clubrooms for veterans’ gatherings as well as spaces for community events. The branch stands as a powerful reminder of the heroic sacrifices of Canadian soldiers during World War One and their struggle to secure justice and social reintegration for the nation’s war veterans.

The branch remained a relevant and vibrant meeting space throughout the years that followed and, on July 31, 1932, hosted a gathering of political activists and socialist groups that led to the formation of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation. The CCF became Canada’s first socialist party. As its name suggested, its founders wanted a political party that promoted universal cooperation for the common good. Members believed capitalism led to inequality and greed and they wanted to make governments responsible for social and economic planning to even out the playing field. We meet at the Royal Canadian Legion Calgary (Alberta No. 1) to recognized the 85th anniversary of the founding of the CCF and its important role in Canadian history.

Source: Alberta Culture and Community Spirit, Historic Resources Management Branch (File: Des. 970)

Grey Eagle Resort and Casino

Grey Eagle Drive & Glenmore Trail Southwest

Calgary, AB T3E 3X8

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Grey Eagle Resort & Casino

The main conference site will be the Grey Eagle Resort & Casino located on the Tsuut’ina First Nation in Calgary. As well as providing world-class facilities, the Grey Eagle Resort & Casino also connects the university with the neighbouring Indigenous communities and allows us to acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the Treaty 7 territory and the traditional territory of the Niitsitapi (Blackfoot), Nakoda (Stoney), and Tsuut’ina. Acknowledging territory shows recognition of and respect for Aboriginal Peoples. It is recognition of their presence both in the past and the present. Recognition and respect are essential elements of establishing healthy, reciprocal relations. These relationships are key to reconciliation. We are all treaty peoples.

Source: CAUT Guide to Acknowledging Traditional Territory

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